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Sessions: Leadership-Strategy [clear filter]
Thursday, November 5
 

1:15pm

A Full Spectrum of Leadership: Museums and the Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. It is built upon a network of partners who together provide access to over 10 million digital objects. Two museum partners, the Missouri History Museum and the Minnesota Streetcar Museum, play two different, but important, roles in this network. The Missouri History Museum preserves St. Louis and Missouri history through exhibitions, programs, research, publications, archives and permanent collections. The Minnesota Streetcar Museum's mission is to preserve Minnesota's streetcar history through the restoration and operation Minnesota streetcars and the preservation, interpretation and display of historic photos and other artifacts.As a DPLA Service Hub, the Missouri History Museum plays a leadership role in its state, bringing together cultural heritage resources from a variety of institutions—including their own—and making them available on a national scale in DPLA. As a Service Hub, they are working to grow the network and build a community of practice in their state. The Minnesota Streetcar Museum is one of 150 contributing institutions in Minnesota that makes its resources available to the Minnesota Digital Library Service Hub, and subsequently to DPLA. An early contributor to DPLA and to the Minnesota Digital Library, the MSM has seen significant impact on visibility and collections usage from these partnerships. After a brief introduction to the DPLA and the valuable role that museums play in this national platform by Amy Rudersdorf, David Henry (Missouri History Museum) and Aaron Isaacs (Minnesota Streetcar Museum) will discuss their museums’ roles in DPLA, and the impacts that participation has had on their institutions and collections. Moderated audience Q&A will follow the brief presentations.

Outcomes: Attendees will gain a better understanding of the DPLA as a national platform and the growth and impacts that museum participation can engender.

Moderators
avatar for Amy Rudersdorf

Amy Rudersdorf

Assistant Director for Content, Digital Public Library of America
Amy Rudersdorf is the assistant director for content at the Digital Public Library of America, where she is responsible for digitization partnerships and related workflows, metadata normalization and shareability, and engagement to promote the DPLA as a community resource. Previously... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Henry

David Henry

Web Developer, Missouri History Museum
I'm a Senior Web Developer at the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis, Missouri. I've been developing for the web for over 15 years in government, education, and museums. In recent years I've been immersed in various strategies to make our collections available online and linking... Read More →
AI

Aaron Isaacs

Minnesota Streetcar Museum


Thursday November 5, 2015 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Calhoun Hyatt Regency Minneapolis 1300 Nicollet Mall Minneapolis, MN 55403

1:15pm

Using Customer Data
As the technology museums use to process admissions, manage memberships and cultivate donors continues to evolve, so do the opportunities to understand, engage with and learn from the individuals who visit and support museums. Visitors who used to represent anonymous transactions are increasingly willing to share individual data at every point of purchase or with every interaction. In turn, their expectations about how organizations communicate with them are changing. An enterprise-wide customer relationship management (CRM) system that aggregates data collected at every touch point provides invaluable information and creates real opportunities for enhancing customer interaction and for building lasting relationships.

The performing arts have a long tradition of building comprehensive views of their customers and then using this data to cultivate deepening relationships with individuals, bringing them along from first-time ticket buyers to repeat attendees to subscribers and donors. The aggregated data collected over time also offers insights into trends, patterns, and behaviors that inform decisions of all kinds from marketing campaigns, to guest services to offer, to programming.

In this session, we will use two case studies as the basis for exploring the opportunities for institutional advancement created when data is collected in a CRM system. Micah Walter, Acting Director of Digital and Emerging Media, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum will discuss how Cooper Hewitt is thinking about the patron data collected through the use of its “Pen” and how that data will inform its CRM strategy. Matthew Tarr, Director, Digital Architect, American Museum of Natural History will present on ANMH’s progress toward using CRM to create an integrated digital/physical experience for visitors. Tom O’Connor, Director, Tessitura Network Enterprise Consulting will provide contextual best practices for the use of CRM in each case study and moderate discussion with the presenters and workshop attendees.

The goal of the session will be to offer best practices for utilizing CRM data on an individual basis to deepen engagement and enhance relationships, as well as on an aggregated basis to provide insight and to inform decisions.

Speakers
TO

Tom O’Connor

Director, Tessitura Network Enterprise Consulting
avatar for Matt Tarr

Matt Tarr

Director, Digital Architect, American Museum of Natural History
Director, Digital Architect @amnh, dad, aging skater... i make things that don't last... bits
MW

Micah Walter

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum


Thursday November 5, 2015 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Great Lakes A2 Hyatt Regency Minneapolis 1300 Nicollet Mall Minneapolis, MN 55403

2:30pm

Money, Money, Money: Turn Great Ideas into Funded Projects
Technology and digital projects - for all of the awesome capacity to engage and inspire, to empower and enable, and to provide effective tools for organizations - don’t come cheap!

This session brings fundraising professionals from the museum sector to the MCN conference to share practical, real-world tools and strategies for turning your great ideas into funded projects AND for finding innovative ways to fund ongoing activities.

Fundraising isn’t typically part of the core skillset for technologists and/or digital media producers. In this session, attendees will learn how to “translate” tech speak into terms that inspire potential donors to get involved; professional fund-raisers will describe their processes and methods for raising money, illustrating both with real-world successes and “not-yet-successes”; and the challenges of funding ongoing activities and/or innovation will be explored, with practical suggestions on how to move forward.


Moderators
avatar for Douglas Hegley

Douglas Hegley

Director of Media & Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Art

Speakers
SC

Susan Chun

Chief Content Officer, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
CG

Charisse Gendron

Foundation Relations Manager, Minneapolis Institute of Art
avatar for Nik Honeysett

Nik Honeysett

CEO, BPOC
Chief Executive Officer, Balboa Park Online CollaborativeNik Honeysett is CEO of the Balboa Park Online Collaborative, a technology non-profit consultancy that provides support, development and strategy for the museums in Balboa Park, San Diego and beyond. Previously, he was Head... Read More →
avatar for Mary Mortenson

Mary Mortenson

Sr. Advancement Executive, Minneapolis Institute of Art


Thursday November 5, 2015 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Calhoun Hyatt Regency Minneapolis 1300 Nicollet Mall Minneapolis, MN 55403

3:45pm

About That Definition of Insanity: Museum Business Models and New Revenue Streams in the Digital Economy
Along with the music industry, newspapers, and Hollywood, museums have seen their business and revenue models irrevocably impacted by the Internet and new digital economies. Yet here as in so many areas, the cultural industry has been slow to change; even the adoption of digital technologies by museums has outstripped their adaptation to 21st century financial realities.

Aiming to provoke a lively debate and brainstorm new approaches to institutional sustainability, this panel opens with the premise that the dominant museum business models are broken: overly dependent on the largess of a dying breed of individual philanthropists and unable to demonstrate their impact and social value to younger, civic-minded audiences, museums risk sinking into public oblivion as well as bankruptcy. Are the commercial, visitor attraction models so often promoted by corporate-minded trustees the only way forward? Or are there other approaches being pioneered in the non-profit sector that can be applied to museums and cultural sites? From paying with data to community sourcing and marketing partnerships, we’ll unpack new ideas in the field in an attempt to stop doing the same fundraising thing over and over again while expecting different results.

Speakers
avatar for Kaywin Feldman

Kaywin Feldman

Director and President, Minneapolis Institute of Art
avatar for Nik Honeysett

Nik Honeysett

CEO, BPOC
Chief Executive Officer, Balboa Park Online CollaborativeNik Honeysett is CEO of the Balboa Park Online Collaborative, a technology non-profit consultancy that provides support, development and strategy for the museums in Balboa Park, San Diego and beyond. Previously, he was Head... Read More →
EN

Elizabeth Neely

Interim Curator of Collections and Exhibitions, Harwood Museum of Art
avatar for Merete Sanderhoff

Merete Sanderhoff

Curator and Senior Adviser, Statens Museum for Kunst
Working to provide free access to, and encourage re-use of, the museum's digitised collections. Organiser of the international Sharing is Caring seminars in Copenhagen, and editor of the anthology Sharing is Caring. Openness and sharing in the cultural heritage sector (2014). I love... Read More →
avatar for Koven Smith

Koven Smith

Director of Digital Adaptation, Blanton Museum of Art
Composer, drummer, and Director of Digital Adaptation at the Blanton Museum of Art. Former Metropolitan Museum of Art, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Denver Art Museum. Teaches occasionally at JHU and/or NYU. Thought up the name "Drinking About Museums."


Thursday November 5, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Calhoun Hyatt Regency Minneapolis 1300 Nicollet Mall Minneapolis, MN 55403

3:45pm

The Constant Transformation and Evolution of Information Management and Technology
Sponsored by the Digital Strategies & Transformations SIG and Information Technologies SIG and Moderated by Douglas Hegley, Director of Media and Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Many organizations are implementing strategic plans that rely on the increased use of digital tools in all aspects of their institutions work. Each organization is approaching this differently but it is clear that information and technology departments have a leading role in the process. The process has caused museum IT departments to think broadly about the notion of institutional digital transformation and evolution and their role in it.

This panel will continue and expand on the discussions started in 2013 during the MCN panel "Any Way You Slice "IT": Managing Technology in the 21st-Century Museum and the 2014 panel discussion A Whole New World: Opportunities and Challenges in the Digital Age. Carolyn Royston, former Head of Digital at Imperial War Museums, UK and now a consultant working with cultural organizations in the UK and internationally, will join this year’s panel to discuss her work with a number of institutions and what it really takes to transform into digital-first thinking organizations and how to manage that transformation process.

We will check in with Princeton University Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Canada Science and Technology Museums on the progress of their strategic plans and what digital transformation looks like in their institutions by exploring these fundamental topics:

Collaboration: How do we work together to accomplish our institutional goals?
Technology foundation: How do we keep pace with the demands of a public and internal audience that expects the same consumer experience at home and at work?
Fundraising: How can we affect funder’s perception of digital projects as only a collection of end products?
Philosophy behind transformation: What are the institutional drivers? What does transformation mean for each of us?
Relevance: How does technology help museums remain relevant in the Digital Age?

Attendees will get an overview of how museums of different size, strategy and organizations are addressing these fundamental issues.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Dawson

Brian Dawson

Chief Digital Officer, Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation
@briandawson | @avspacemuseum | @AgMuseum | @SciTechMuseum | LinkedInBrian Dawson is the Chief Digital Officer at the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, which also operates the Canada Aviation and Space Museum and the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum.  As CDO, Brian drives the development and implementation of the strategy for digital platforms, content, distribution and engagement through... Read More →
avatar for Carolyn Royston

Carolyn Royston

Independent Consultant
avatar for Jeff Steward

Jeff Steward

Director of DIET, Harvard Art Museums
Jeff Steward is the Director of Digital Infrastructure and Emerging Technology (DIET) at the Harvard Art Museums. For the past 17 years he has worked at museums with museum data. He provides leadership and guidance on the use of a wide range of technologies at the museums to reshape... Read More →
JS

Janet Strohl-Morgan

Associate Director for Information and Technology, Princeton University Art Museum
Janet Strohl-Morgan is the Associate Director for Information and Technology at the Princeton University Art Museum. Janet oversees a department dedicated to providing universal digital access to the Museum’s collections. Janet leads a team of people with responsibilities for all... Read More →


Thursday November 5, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States
 
Friday, November 6
 

10:15am

Mentoring in Museums
Digital Strategy & Transformation SIG

Panelists:
Jennifer Schmitt, Head of Information Technology and Electronic Communicationsde, Cordova Sculpture Park and Museum

Jana Hill, Digital Engagement Manager, Amon Carter Museum of American Art
Carolyn Royston, Executive Board, MCN, Independent Consultant
Liz Neely, President, MCN, Harwood Museum of Art

Panelists will speak about their experiences with mentoring in museums, either as mentor or mentee, or comment on the desire for more direct/structured mentoring programs.In the last year, the conversation about mentoring in museum has moved to the forefront. Invisible architecture can be interpreted as the unseen digital infrastructure, but it also includes the intricate human relationships that move the museum forward. With a number of shifts in the upper leadership of the museum community, where do mid-career museum professionals go for guidance and role models? What can we do within and across institutions to help support each other?

This panel will discuss their personal experiences including their role as mentors, mentees, and how to bridge the gap when feeling isolated in your own museum. Jenn Schmitt and Jana Hill will discuss their experiences with the Getty Leadership NextGen program and the idea of peer mentoring. Jenn can discuss cross-departmental mentorship and her experience working with deCordova’s Head of Marketing and PR. Carolyn Royston will address how she participates in more formal structured mentoring programs, and how those relationships can be successful using digital communication as well as physical proximity.

Topics may include: Is mentorship about subject matter and teaching? Or relationships and leadership? How does this lack of mentoring affect the digital transformations we are striving for? Does risk taking become more of a struggle when there feels like less support?

Following this the panel will open up the discussion to the audience to brainstorm with the panel. What does the MCN community want? What would they find helpful as we envision building a more structured program?. Liz Neely and Carolyn Royston will be representatives of the MCN Board, and can speak to the goals for an MCN-led program going forward.Potential Additional Activity:Speed Networking: Mentorship Edition - Have attendees write down a subject they’d like to mentor and/or a subject they want to be mentored in so they can connect more easily.

Speakers
avatar for Jana Hill

Jana Hill

Digital Engagement Manager, Amon Carter Museum of American Art
EN

Elizabeth Neely

Interim Curator of Collections and Exhibitions, Harwood Museum of Art
avatar for Carolyn Royston

Carolyn Royston

Independent Consultant
JS

Jennifer Schmitt

Head of Information Technology and Electronic Communications, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum


Friday November 6, 2015 10:15am - 11:15am
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States

11:30am

Getting $*IT Done: Implementing Your Digital Strategy
Over the last few years, museums have developed strategic plans to leverage technology in support of goals such as community engagement, institutional alignment, scholarship, media production and artistic excellence. Multiple museums have created Digital Strategies (or other tools such as Road Maps or Guiding Principles) to guide these efforts. Museum technology departments have been reorganized and comprehensive back-end strategies and museum wide processes created to activate their world-class collections, connect art with people, and drive on-site and online attendance. HOWEVER, the big questions remain: How are museums implementing these strategies? What processes do they use to support and approve digital initiatives? How do they measure success? How do they keep strategies current and top-of-mind? How do they get support from management and donors? What works and more importantly what doesn’t?

This session will look at how The Cleveland Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, The National Gallery and Philadelphia Museum of Art are approaching digital strategy and implementation. Panelists will explore the scope and core elements of each museum’s digital strategy; staffing requirements and the interdepartmental steering team put in place to guide digital strategy; the backend systems put in place to support flexible access, both in theory and practice; and the effort required to pull everything together. As an added bonus, panelists will describe any missteps along the way and how hurdles were overcome effectively.Purpose and objectives - attendees will:Learn several different but overlapping approaches to digital strategy, with the pros and cons of each.Learn specific methods for thinking and acting strategically to deliver digital and technology initiatives.Learn practical approaches to developing a meaningful technology and digital media strategy.Learn communication skills and how to develop buy-in across the organization.Learn how to build strong and effective partnerships across an organization.Plus: plenty of opportunities for questions and answers.Format: Multi-presenter panel, with Q&A woven in throughout the session.Theme: Leadership

Moderators
avatar for Jane Alexander

Jane Alexander

Cleveland Museum of Art, The Cleveland Museum of Art
I'm proud to serve on the Board of MCN - digital, strategy, data and innovationhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/janealexander

Speakers
avatar for John Gordy

John Gordy

Chief of Digital Outreach, National Gallery of Art
avatar for Douglas Hegley

Douglas Hegley

Director of Media & Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Art


Friday November 6, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States

2:00pm

Museums Are from Mars, Visitors Are from Venus: Three Strategies for Interstellar Communication
Collection information isn’t always written in the language of the people, and interpretive tools require the human touch. Bringing your collection resource into the 21st century is a long road. Even more tricky is rallying an entire institution around these goals—and there are multiple approaches.

Do you take the path of overall restructuring? Do you empower a group of cross-departmental leaders? Do you bring in leadership from outside? How do you build a better collection resource…one that fuels online collections, in-gallery interactives, and internal research? What sort of strategies can position you to improve a resource that everyone, including the visitor, should own? How does an institution take advantage of digital tools to bring the visitor closer, without sacrificing core projects?

Three digital collections and information managers will tell their institutions’ stories on using their digital collections and content to seed change within an institution. Overall restructuring can place your digital collections in the administrative realm of public engagement. Empowering cross-departmental leaders can direct you to bridge the museum-visitor communication gap with data. Leadership from outside can shake up approaches to content management and distribution to new audiences.

We will tell the story of three different institutions’ strategies for overhauling collection resources strategically with the visitor and the museum’s future in mind.

Moderators
avatar for Jessica Milby

Jessica Milby

Assistant Director for Collection Information, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Speakers
avatar for Ellice Engdahl

Ellice Engdahl

Digital Collections & Content Manager, The Henry Ford
avatar for Jana Hill

Jana Hill

Digital Engagement Manager, Amon Carter Museum of American Art


Friday November 6, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States

3:15pm

Critique: Leadership Meet Digital, Digital Meet Leadership
Sponsored by the Digital Strategies & Transformations SIG and Information Technologies SIG and Moderated by Carolyn Royston, independent consultant focused on digital transformation.

MCN traditionally has had a difficult time engaging leadership to participate in the conference resulting in too much preaching to the choir (for attendees), and not enough face to face discussions with decision makers. This program hopes to end the stalemate by inviting non-digital executives, open to change, a chance to present ideas that could use direct input from experts in our community “for free.” We’ll get face to face time with influential leadership, helping all of us think more holistically and strategically about integrating technology in our organizations.

The MCN community can help cultural executives plan how digital can best serve the needs of their individual organization. We know that this should start as they imagine or initiate projects, not after the ideas have been set in stone. We’ll advise them on the most effective solutions to their questions, whether enhancing digital components or streamlining an over-designed proposal.

Some of the potential people and problems for review include:

Anita Kassof, the new Executive Director of the Baltimore Museum of Industry, is helping reimagine the decades old organization. With a robust school attendance, but aging infrastructure, it’s time for a change. She has countless ideas, but she’s not sure yet what makes the most sense given BMI small staff and budget.

Annie Polland, V.P. , the Tenement Museum, has successfully produced a MUSE award-winning stand-alone digital project, but as an institution committed to storytelling through docent-led tours, finding the right balance between technology and the personal experience is still challenging. This year the Museum begins developing their new historic site tour and exhibition space that would tell the stories of immigrants who settled in New York City after 1945. They have a grant to incorporate technology, but what’s the best approach?

Moderators
avatar for Carolyn Royston

Carolyn Royston

Independent Consultant

Speakers
avatar for Anita Kassof

Anita Kassof

Executive Director, Baltimore Museum of Industry
Anita Kassof is the Executive Director of the Baltimore Museum of Industry, a leading history museum that celebrates the industrial and technological heritage of the Baltimore region. She is responsible for strategic visioning and overall management of the museum, including staff, programs... Read More →
avatar for Alice Rubin

Alice Rubin

Director of Special Projects, Programs and Partnerships, Museum of Jewish Heritage
avatar for Deborah Schwartz

Deborah Schwartz

President, Brooklyn Historical Society
Deborah Schwartz is President of the Brooklyn Historical Society, a nationally renowned urban history center, founded in 1863.  A recognized leader in the field of museum education, Ms. Schwartz teaches a graduate seminar on museum management for NYU’s Museum Studies Program, and... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States

4:30pm

The Agile Museum: 21st-century Leadership
Leadership is changing, and innovation today is being driven by new management practices, described by terms like Lean, Agile, and Radical. In this session, the panelists will present both theory and practice as applied in the cultural heritage sector.

Based on the work of influential thinkers such as Eric Ries (The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses) and Stephen Denning (The Leaders Guide to Radical Management), the panel will lead the attendees through a fast-paced session that includes the following topics:

- Why change leadership approach?
- Change how?
- Importance of defining workplace culture and value proposition
- Staff: hiring, on-boarding, empowermentAgile/Lean methodologies for leadership
- Self-organizing teams
- Organizational and project structures
- Iteration and cycles of continuous improvement
- Radical transparency
- Conflict resolutionImpactExamples from the MIA, High Museum, and sister institutions

Moderator & Presenter:
Douglas Hegley, Director of Media and Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Panelist:
Kaywin Feldman, Director and President, Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Mike Mouw, Director of Multimedia Technology, High Museum of Art


Moderators
avatar for Douglas Hegley

Douglas Hegley

Director of Media & Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Art

Speakers
avatar for Kaywin Feldman

Kaywin Feldman

Director and President, Minneapolis Institute of Art
avatar for Mike Mouw

Mike Mouw

Intrapreneur, Mouw Tech Consulting
Intrapreneur who is a Certified Professional Project Manager (CPPM) and Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) and works as a creative and technical director using digital project management methods—including Scrum agile product development—to guide multidisciplinary teams and talented vendors... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States
 
Saturday, November 7
 

2:00pm

New Museum Technology Leaders Reflect on Their Adventures
In the past 18 months, the museum sector has seen an influx of new, experienced technology leaders. Five of these professionals will participate in a moderated discussion to share their fresh perspectives on technology in the museum and cultural heritage arena. Each brings a unique set of experiences and a deep knowledge base to their new posts. Let’s find out what they’ve observed, how they are applying their skills, and what the future holds for all five at their new organizations.

This session will be a moderated discussion that includes discussion around the following questions: Why did you join our field? How did you get recruited? What sold you on the job?What sector(s) did you come from, what do you bring from that experience into your new field?What should museums be integrating/implementing that you have experience with in your previous stop(s)? What have you observed in our field so far? What surprised you - did anything really make your jaw drop? What’s giving you the biggest headaches so far? What do you see as most-entrenched in museums? How does it differ from your past experience? Okay, honestly, did you think it would be “easy”? Has it been? How could we be “more popular” with the commercial sector - get on their radar, get better services? Are we really under-resourced? How do we compare to your previous stop(s)? Any advice for us? Please! What questions do you still have? What will you be digging into next? Plus: plenty of opportunities for questions and answers

Moderator: Douglas Hegley, Director of Media and Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Panelists - alphabetical order:
Doug Allen, CIO, Nelson Atkins Museum of Art
Anne Bennett, CIO, Toledo Museum of Art
Tim Rager, Director of Technology, Seattle Art Museum
Richard Scott, Director of Information Services, Detroit Institute of Arts
Bryon Thornburgh, Director of Technology, Denver Art Museum

Moderators
avatar for Douglas Hegley

Douglas Hegley

Director of Media & Technology, Minneapolis Institute of Art

Speakers
avatar for Doug Allen

Doug Allen

CIO, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
New to the museum world, but have worked in both for-profit (financial services and retail) and not-for-profits (higher ed and classical music) for over 30 years.
AB

Anne Bennett

CIO, Toledo Museum of Art
TR

Tim Rager

Director of Technology, Seattle Art Museum
Tim Rager is the Director of Technology for the Seattle Art Museum (SAM). Tim was excited to join SAM in 2014 to help deliver highly effective back-office solutions as well as digital experiences that enliven, excite and engage their community. Current projects include strategic planning... Read More →
avatar for Richard Scott

Richard Scott

Director of Information Systems, Detroit Institute of Arts
I am new to the museum world, but have always enjoyed visiting museums when travelling. I have a 20+ year technology background in financial services, consulting, hospitality services and retail. I am excited to explore new uses of technology to further the Detroit Institute of Art's... Read More →
avatar for Bryon Thornburgh

Bryon Thornburgh

Director of Technology, Denver Art Museum
Bryon Thornburgh joined the Denver Art Museum in May 2014. He has spent his entire career working in technology, but this is his first position in the museum sector. Bryon's career has spanned a number of industries including manufacturing, local government, public relations and financial... Read More →


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Great Lakes A1 1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, United States